We’re having a “Seduced by Sound” party

Come to our free day party to see eight of Austin’s best bands!

Date: Wednesday, 3/15

Where: The Townsend, 718 Congress

When: 2 – 5:30pm

Lineup:

2:00: Nathan Edge
2:20: Walker Lukens
2:45: Annabelle Chairlegs
3:20: Tee-Double (Terrany Johnson)
3:35: Justin Wade Thompson (JW Thompson)
3:50: John Evans Band
4:15: The Ghost Wolves
4:40: Readings from the book
4:55: Shinyribs

To read what these artists say about making music, get the book now. Use code SBSFREESHIP to get free shipping through 3/22/17.

Or you can pick one up at the party.

Each book comes with 50+ MP3s, and a portion of sales is donated to the Health Alliance for Austin Musicians (HAAM).

Please join us!

 

Top 5 Austin clubs that musicians love

What is it about a club that makes a musician love to play there (other than actually gettin’ the cash money)?

For musicians in “Seduced by Sound: Austin,” it’s respect, friendly people and good sound. And free beer. Definitely free beer.

We made a list of the artists’ favorite venues, which includes long-lasting clubs considered hallowed ground and newer venues that feel like the crossroads where Old and New Austin meet to dance and have a party.

Here’s what musicians say about the top five:

Mohawk Denzel 825

#5: The Mohawk

“I think it has some of the best sound in town and usually books the best acts. It’s a great place with great people, cheap drinks and an awesome location.”
Roger Sellers (Bayonne)

“Mohawk gets a lot of edgy touring shows, and you can join some very interesting bills with bands from out of town.”
—Jonny Wolf (the Ghost Wolves)

abgb 825.png

#4: The Austin Beer Garden Brewing Co. (aka, the ABGB)

“They’ve invested in a great sound system, lighting and an engineer, and they’ve built a solid music community. One thing that makes them stand out to musicians is their sense of appreciation of music in general.”
—Bill Ogden (Wild Bill and the Lost Knobs)

“ABGB has the best band hospitality around and a wonderful South Austin neighborhood vibe.”
—Jonny Wolf (the Ghost Wolves)

hole 825

#3: The Hole in the Wall

“What I like the most is its indie attitude. They book all kinds of bands and artists with different, even fringe styles. I’ve never felt like they were too pretentious about it — just friendly people who love hip music.”
—Tyler Wallace (Union Specific)

“I love the front room of the Hole in the Wall. It’s intimate but it gets rowdy, and I love seeing the passers-by through the window behind the stage. It’s an iconic Austin venue that feels like home and echoes of musical legends long before my time.”
—Landry McMeans (Lonesome Heroes, Gangstagrass)

White Horse 825

#2: The White Horse

“The vibe the owners and staff have created is keeping Austin music alive. They embody what Austin was and should always be.”
—Westen Borghesi (East Side Dandies, Thrift Set Orchestra)

“The White Horse has this energy that makes you feel glad you are alive.”
—Jeremy Slemenda (White Ghost Shivers)

continental 825

#1: The Continental Club

“It has the Old Austin vibe, it has the history, but not in a kitschy or nostalgic way, and it feels contemporary and vital, too. People all over the world know that, not only is it a landmark that needs to be seen, the music on any given night will be good.”
—Nathan Singleton (The Sideshow Tragedy)

“There is musical history you can feel coming up through your feet on that stage.”
Emily Gimble

There’s a lot more about these clubs and a host of others, past and present, in Seduced by Sound: Austin. If you want even more of an inside look at the best Austin clubs, get a copy of the book. Then check the Austin Chronicle music listings, see who’s playing and head out to support live music in Austin. Have fun!

ABOUT THE BOOK

In Seduced by Sound: Austin, over 100 of the city’s best musicians and bands talk about why and how they make music. With stories, reflections and even advice – combined with tributes to legends such as Stevie Ray Vaughan and Townes Van Zandt – it’s a look at the past, present and future of the Austin music scene. The book also comes with 50+ MP3s from some of the artists who keep Austin, Texas, known worldwide as the Live Music Capital of the World.

ABOUT THE PUBLISHER

If you want to know more about Weeva’s custom books, check out Weeva.com.

https://www.seton.net/news/2015/03/11/jeff-cook-filling-the-tip-jar-is-a-great-thing-to-do-but-usually-it-isnt-enough/

Why SXSW Co-Founder Louis Meyers Was a Man with Many Fans

LouisJMeyers1997
Photo by Ralph Barrera. Used with permission from the Austin American-Statesman.

You can feel the love rising off the pages when Seduced by Sound musicians talk about Louis Meyers. Louis, who passed away in 2016, was a co-founder of SXSW, making his impact on Austin pretty much incalculable. But he also had a huge impact on a multitude of musicians as a mentor and “head cheerleader.” Louis cared passionately about music and about people – and a lot of people cared about him.

With SXSW 2017 nearly upon us, we thought we’d share a few quotes about Louis from the Legends and Legacies section of the book. We have to say, they’re pretty sweet.

“He would find creative and talented people and give them guidance. From Louis I learned a lot about how to conduct myself professionally, how to keep an even keel and listen to what people had to say. Louis was never dismissive of anyone, ever.”
—Cody Wyoming, musician

“His mantra was simple and consistent: ‘Who’s looking out for the musicians?’ His focus throughout his entire career was on nurturing and supporting the community of people who make music as their vocation. From the working-stiff sideman to the solo singer-songwriter to the hardcore punk band, Louis was their constant advocate and head cheerleader.”
—Mark Rubin, musician/writer

“Louis was one of the finest human beings who ever walked the earth. . . . When he became a person of power in the music business, he was so nice to everyone. He was nice to people he didn’t need to be nice to, and that was really impressive to me. He just seemed to exist to help people.”
—Gurf Morlix, musician/producer

In the Legends and Legacies section, you’ll find some fun stories about Louis from artists who worked with him. You’ll also find musicians telling stories about and paying tribute to other people important in Austin music history, including:

  • Blaze Foley
  • Clifford Antone
  • Doug Sahm
  • Guy Clark
  • Ian “Mac” McLagan
  • Janis Joplin
  • Johnny Gimble
  • Louis Meyers
  • Nick Curran
  • Paul Ray
  • Pinetop Perkins
  • Ronnie Dawson
  • Slim Richey
  • Stevie Ray Vaughan
  • Townes Van Zandt
  • Uncle Walt’s Band

There’s a lot of Austin history in that list. We’re grateful to be able to share it.

Ready to read some great stories? Get your book now at SeducedbySound.com.

ABOUT THE BOOK

In Seduced by Sound: Austin, over 100 of the city’s best musicians and bands talk about why and how they make music. With stories, reflections and even advice – combined with tributes to legends such as Stevie Ray Vaughan and Townes Van Zandt – it’s a look at the past, present and future of the Austin music scene. The book also comes with 50+ MP3s from some of the artists who keep Austin, Texas, known worldwide as the Live Music Capital of the World.

ABOUT THE PUBLISHER

To find out more about Weeva’s custom books, check out Weeva.com.

Fans and Musicians Say Thank You to David Bowie

bowie-store-mockup-square

When David Bowie passed away in 2016, Austin took it hard. Our social media feeds were full of grief as well as thank yous to Bowie for his music. Local bands added “Heroes” to their sets. We even had a David Bowie Street for a few days.

The outpouring of grief from fans showed that he didn’t just transform modern music; he also transformed people’s lives. With his embrace of theatricality, ambiguity and experimentation, Bowie seemed to give us all permission to be different.

To honor him, Weeva invited fans across the world to write thank you letters to Bowie and his family. We’re excited to present these letters in our newest book – Starman: Fans Say Goodbye to David Bowie. We’ll also be presenting the book to his family.

In Starman, people write about the first time they heard his music, the excitement of his live shows, his kindness to his fans. A few themes repeat: “He showed me it was OK to be different.” “He made me feel I wasn’t alone.” “He saved my life.”

In Seduced by Sound: Austin, so many local musicians talk about Bowie’s influence on their music that it puts him in the top 10 of the most influential artists – people who helped shape the sound of Austin. (Read previous posts on what Austin musicians say about the top four most influential bands/artists – the Beatles, Dylan, Hendrix and Elvis – and the next six most influential.)

SEDUCED BY BOWIE

For Adrian Quesada (The Echocentrics, Brownout), Bowie was one of the great frontmen and an amazing lyricist. For Sabrina Ellis (A Giant Dog, Sweet Spirit), Bowie’s influence was about  artistic freedom. For Lauren Larson (Ume), it was dancing to artists like David Bowie as a little girl that made her fall in love with music’s ability to make us move.

And in the words of more Seduced by Sound musicians:

“Nothing affected me as much as David Bowie’s The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars. The weird just kept getting weirder from then on.”
—Justin Wade Thompson

“Bowie’s Low and Heroes and the ambient music series Brian Eno did changed the way I thought records could sound and led me to being a more experimental artist.”
Jonas Wilson

“Performers like Bowie inspired us to make our live performance a theatrical show, and we’ve put on our costumes and danced at every show we’ve played, be it for a lone bartender or a thousand-person crowd. Perhaps what’s most inspiring about Bowie was the way he never stopped moving forward. He had so many successful albums, and so many lesser writers would’ve settled into a comfortable role of churning out Ziggy Stardusts, but Bowie never settled. It felt like he never took on a project that he wasn’t actually interested in, and that’s a philosophy we try to embrace.”
—Aaron Miller (Sphynx)

A LETTER FROM A FAN

Seduced by Sound: Austin is a kind of thank you letter from musicians. In Starman, we hear from fans who were inspired to make their own music. One of our favorite stories is from an Austin fan:

page-grid-1“Last Friday, I was at my job, taking tickets at a garage at a church, and feeling lost and defeated. All of a sudden, I started singing, ‘It’s a god-awful small affair/to the girl with the mousy hair . . .’ I realized that I had taught myself to sing, through all these years, and almost every song is David’s. He often sang in a range that I could manage, and if I couldn’t go low or high, I’d practice in the car till I could. Standing there in the garage, singing at the top of my lungs, I had folks come up to me, stand and hear me, and shout enthusiastic encouragement (‘SING IT, GIRL!’) and everything, for just a hot minute, was all right.”

From all of us at Weeva – thank you, David, for your music and for making us feel things are all right.

WANT MORE STORIES?

Get both Seduced by Sound: Austin and Starman now at the Weeva bookstore. If you want to know more about Weeva’s custom books, check out Weeva.com.

ABOUT THE BOOKS

SEDUCED BY SOUND: AUSTIN

In Seduced by Sound: Austin, over 100 of the city’s best musicians and bands talk about why and how they make music. With stories, reflections and even advice – combined with tributes to legends such as Stevie Ray Vaughan and Townes Van Zandt – it’s a look at the past, present and future of the Austin music scene. The book also comes with 50+ MP3s from some of the artists who keep Austin, Texas, known worldwide as the Live Music Capital of the World.

STARMAN: FANS SAY GOODBYE TO DAVID BOWIE

David Bowie changed everything – music, fashion, culture. Once “Space Oddity” hit turntables all over the world, it felt like nothing was the same. After his passing in 2016, Weeva asked fans to write thank you letters to Bowie and his family to honor this great artist. With personal stories of how he touched their lives, Starman: Fans Say Goodbye to David Bowie is a unique portrait of the artist through the eyes of his fans.

6 Musicians and Bands Who Helped Shape the Sound of Austin

Neil Young taught artistic restlessness. The Stones’ taught top-tier craftsmanship backed with the looseness of pure boogie. David Bowie taught theatricality.

For musicians, listening to legends is like being in school, and those lessons are often life changers.

In Seduced by Sound: Austin, we asked some of Austin’s best artists to talk about those life-changing moments. We also wanted to know which music legends have had the most influence – who has shaped the sound of Austin?

When we tallied the number of times these influential artist were mentioned, the results weren’t surprising. In part one of this post, we named the top four: The Beatles are by far the most influential, followed by Dylan, Hendrix and Elvis.

In part two we offer what local musicians say about the next six major influences: Neil Young, David Bowie, the Rolling Stones, Muddy Waters, Chuck Berry and Little Richard. (These aren’t in order; most of these folks were in a tie – also not surprising.)

Here are more of our favorite “music lessons” from Seduced by Sound: Austin.

NEIL YOUNG

“My mom played me ‘The Needle and the Damage Done’ on her Epiphone acoustic when I was 3 or 4 years old. I knew it was important, but I didn’t know why.”
—John Michael Schoepf (The Happen-Ins)

“I was 7 years old the first time I heard Neil Young on the radio in Paris. I fell in love immediately with his words and the delivery. He has still such an intimate delivery yet a huge sound. . . . Some of his songs get my creative juices going after just one bar — ‘Cowgirl in the Sand’ and ‘Down by the River’ are in my top five favorite tunes.”
LouLou Ghelichkhani (Thievery Corporation, BONEFUR)

“From Neil’s records and from his biography, Shakey, I’ve learned artistic restlessness, never trying to harvest the same ground for too long before moving to other creative territory for a while.”
Evan Charles (Altamesa)

DAVID BOWIE

“Nothing affected me as much as David Bowie’s The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars. The weird just kept getting weirder from then on.”
Justin Wade Thompson (Boosy Cray)

“Performers like Bowie inspired us to make our live performance a theatrical show, and we’ve put on our costumes and danced at every show we’ve played, be it for a lone bartender or a thousand-person crowd. Perhaps what’s most inspiring about Bowie was the way he never stopped moving forward.”
—Aaron Miller (Sphynx)

THE ROLLING STONES

“From the Stones you learn the art of looseness and boogie, but at the same time of top-tier craftsmanship. You look at some of the stuff they’ve done that’s going to stand up forever, and it gives you a glimpse into what something with true staying power and endurance looks like.”
Evan Charles (Altamesa)

MUDDY WATERS

“(Ian McLagan) loved rhythm and blues, and the early blues guys had a lot of influence on him. There was piano in a lot of that old blues music, all those stabby little piano bits. That’s where he got his early style — Memphis Slim, Otis Spann, who played with Muddy Waters, and Booker T. Jones. He told me he heard Muddy Waters one night and it changed his whole life.”
Todd V. Wolfson, photographer, in a tribute to Ian McLagan

CHUCK BERRY

“Seeing Chuck Berry do the duck walk on the Johnny Carson show as a kid made me say, ‘I wanna do that’ He had it all — great voice, great guitar playing, possibly the best lyrics ever and, most important to me, he had that X factor as an entertainer that cannot be learned.”
Jesse Dayton

LITTLE RICHARD

“When I was 4 my parents had a tape that had Little Richard and Jerry Lee Lewis on it. ‘Tutti Frutti’ was the A side and ‘Great Balls of Fire’ was the B side. That made me dance, and I also knew that was important.”
—John Michael Schoepf (The Happen-Ins)

“An early childhood memory that sticks with me is seeing Little Richard for the first time on television. I remember asking my mother, ‘Why does he look like that?’ Her response was perfect: ‘Because he’s Little Richard.’ I understood it immediately.”
Justin Wade Thompson (Boosy Cray)

A WAY TO SAY THANK YOU

Because Weeva projects are also about gratitude, we wanted to give Austin musicians a way to thank the top muses by writing notes in copies of the book. We’re sending those books to the ones who are still with us, including Paul McCartney, Neil Young, Little Richard, Chuck Berry and others. We hope to let these great artists know just how influential they are on a personal level. It’s a way for us to collectively thank them for inspiring the sounds of Austin.

WANT MORE STORIES?

Get your book now at SeducedbySound.com. If you want to know more about Weeva’s custom books, check out Weeva.com.

PHOTO CREDITS

All photos public domain or licensed according to Wikimedia Commons.

Neil Young, Barcelona, 2007. Photo by F. Antolín Hernandez.

David Bowie, from AVRO’s Dutch television show TopPop, 1974.

The Rolling Stones – Brian Jones, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Bill Wyman – Stockholm, 1966.

Muddy Waters, with James Cotton, Toronto, 1978.

Chuck Berry: Publicity photo by Universal Attractions, 1957.

Little Richard, at the University of Texas Forty Acres Festival, 2007. Photo by Anna Bleker.

4 Musicians and Bands Who Shaped the Sound of Austin

Hearing the Beatles for the first time when Dad pops a cassette into a car stereo.

Listening to Mom play a Neil Young song on her guitar.

Watching Chuck Berry do the duck walk on the Johnny Carson show.

For Austin musicians Marshall Hood, John Michael Schoepf and Jesse Dayton, these were the moments that inspired them to say, “I want to do that!”

In Seduced by Sound: Austin, we ask some of Austin’s best artists to talk about those moments. We also wanted to know which music legends have had the most influence on our city’s musicians – who has shaped the sound of Austin?

You can see the variety of the influences – from Johnny Cash to Prince to Stephane Grappelli to Brian Eno – in Austin’s eclectic music scene. But there are some artists whose names appear again and again. When we tallied them up, we have to admit the results weren’t all that surprising.

The Beatles are by far the most influential, followed by Dylan, Hendrix and Elvis. (We’ll list the next six most influential artists in part two of this post.)

What’s interesting is how personal the connections are for musicians. They might not sound like their influences now, but they see themselves as students of the great teachers. Some have studied every note and the structure of every line in great songs. Some just feel inspired to write their own songs when they listen.

Listening to musicians talk about their most important influences offers some of our favorite “music lessons” from Seduced by Sound: Austin. Here they are in order.

#1: THE BEATLES

“I think the quality, the uniqueness of that music gave me an incredible understanding of real and true quality in music during my formative years.”
George Reiff

“My dad bought a Beatles cassette tape, Past Masters, Volume One, when he got a car that had a cassette tape player in it. Of course I’d heard music before then, but nothing that had any impact on me. When I heard them I instantly became just enamored with their music. When I heard them, I wanted to do that.”
Marshall Hood (Warren Hood Band, Toni Price)

“They showed me a path to turn sadness and other negative feelings into joy and creativity in music.”
Freddie Steady Krc

#2: BOB DYLAN

“I’d say it’s pretty obvious and true that Bob Dylan made me want to write. I’ve been trying to write a better song than Dylan since I was 15.”
Charles Ben Russell (Cartright)

“I admire Bob Dylan for being able to get blood out of a stone, where the stone is an idiom or cliché. He finds its essence and turns it back into truth.”
Steven Collins (Deadman)

“I followed Bob Dylan all through his early years via Folkways magazine and owned his first few albums, which actually got me into a little bit of trouble. When I was told by my junior high school to cut my hair or don’t come back, I said to myself, ‘What would Bob Dylan do in this situation?’ So I told ’em to go pound sand and ended up in a juvenile home — not the smartest move on my part. Of course, Bob’s later advice was, ‘Don’t follow leaders. Watch your parking meters.’ But I didn’t know that then.”
James Williamson (The Stooges)

# 3: JIMI HENDRIX

Junior Brown once told me while we were working on a Ray Price record, ‘Never trust an electric guitar player who didn’t go through a Hendrix phase, unless he started playing before Hendrix came out.’ ”
Jesse Dayton, from a tribute to Stevie Ray Vaughan

# 4: ELVIS

“The first record that really moved me when I was a kid was Elvis Presley’s version of Bill Monroe’s song ‘Blue Moon of Kentucky.’ It still sounds great today, and the vocals are bathed in that Sun Records echo. It’s easy to forget how influential Elvis was, but the sound of that record bouncing off the walls of our house back in 1958-59 was unforgettable.”
Barfield the Tyrant of Texas Funk

You’ll find quotes about the next most influential artists or bands in part 2 of this post.

A WAY TO SAY THANK YOU

Because Weeva projects are also about gratitude, we wanted to give Austin musicians a way to thank the top muses by writing notes in copies of the book. We’re sending those books to the ones who are still with us, including Paul McCartney, Neil Young, Little Richard, Chuck Berry and others. We hope to let these great artists know just how influential they are on a personal level. It’s a way for us to collectively thank them for inspiring the sounds of Austin.

WANT MORE STORIES?

Get your book now at SeducedbySound.com. If you want to know more about Weeva’s custom books, check out Weeva.com.

PHOTO CREDITS

All photos used above are public domain or licensed according to Wikimedia Commons, except for the Beatles photo, which is public domain from the New York Public Library’s Digital Collections.

  • The Beatles, publicity still from “A Hard Day’s Night,” 1964. Billy Rose Theatre Division, The New York Public Library.
  • Bob Dylan, Toronto, 1980. Photo by Jean-Luc Ourlin.
  • Jimi Hendrix and Noel Redding, from Dutch television show Fenklup, 1967.
  • Elvis Presley, Mississippi-Alabama Fairgrounds in Tupelo, Mississippi, 1956.